The Mille Lacs County Times http://millelacscountytimes.com The Mille Lacs County Times cover community news, sports, current events and provides advertising and information for Milaca, Minnesota and it's surrounding areas. Fri, 27 Mar 2015 01:55:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 City Council news: March 19 meeting http://millelacscountytimes.com/2015/03/26/city-council-news-march-19-meeting/ http://millelacscountytimes.com/2015/03/26/city-council-news-march-19-meeting/#comments Fri, 27 Mar 2015 01:39:09 +0000 http://millelacscountytimes.com/?p=110528 The Milaca City Council conducted the following business at its March 19 meeting. This report was written by Brielle Bredsten.

Donation to Milaca Fire Department
Mike Stewart from the Anoka Winter Knights snowmobile club presented a donation of $600 to the Milaca Fire Department for the purchase of a new radio. Because the club doesn’t maintain any trails, funds are used to give back to communities. Donations are made for winter-related activity rescue equipment. In the past, the group also donated $2,500 to the Sheriff’s Office for new defibrillators.

Blue Cross grant received
The city received a Blue Cross Blue Shield grant for $17,000. The money will be used to provide the community with art and children-related activities. Also, a portion of the funds will go toward creating a park near Teal’s.
Park building and splash pad update
Plans are being drawn up for the park building and splash pad. City Manager Greg Lerud estimated the building would be ready by late summer.

Band shell
accessibility project
The council reviewed the bids for the band shell accessibility project to build a wheelchair ramp. Bids from four construction companies were collected, but all were higher than the $47,000 awarded by a grant from the Otto Bremer Foundation. The council decided to reject all bids at this time.

Clearing brush
Council Member Ken Muller spoke to other members about clearing the brush. The cost is $2,200 per acre for 14 acres total, which Muller explained would be reimbursed by the state. Rum River Timber Harvesting out of Onamia will be providing the services and grinding down the stumps. The council voted to go ahead with the project.

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Mille Lacs farmer directs funds to Community Christian School http://millelacscountytimes.com/2015/03/26/mille-lacs-farmer-directs-funds-to-community-christian-school-2/ http://millelacscountytimes.com/2015/03/26/mille-lacs-farmer-directs-funds-to-community-christian-school-2/#comments Fri, 27 Mar 2015 01:35:10 +0000 http://millelacscountytimes.com/?p=110522  

 

Joel Stottrup / Union-Eagle Donation to Christian School Staff members, students, and supporters of the Community Christian School in Pease took part in a presentation of a $2,500 check from Monsanto Corp. on March 3 at the school. Area farm couple Dale and Tori Shelley, as customers of Monsanto, were able to direct the donation to a charitable cause and chose this school that their children attend.  Seated in front are the Shelley children – Max, Owen, Jack and Alex. Standing from left are Dale Shelley, Mike Schimming, Tori Shelley, LeRoy Koppendrayer, Angela Alkire, Monsanto representative Roger Peterson, school principal Tracy Rosenberg, and school office worker Amy Banks.

Joel Stottrup / Union-Eagle
Donation to Christian School
Staff members, students, and supporters of the Community Christian School in Pease took part in a presentation of a $2,500 check from Monsanto Corp. on March 3 at the school. Area farm couple Dale and Tori Shelley, as customers of Monsanto, were able to direct the donation to a charitable cause and chose this school that their children attend. Seated in front are the Shelley children – Max, Owen, Jack and Alex. Standing from left are Dale Shelley, Mike Schimming, Tori Shelley, LeRoy Koppendrayer, Angela Alkire, Monsanto representative Roger Peterson, school principal Tracy Rosenberg, and school office worker Amy Banks.

The Community Christian School has received a $2,500 donation from Mille Lacs County farmer Dale Shelley and America’s Farmers Grow Communities, sponsored by the Monsanto Fund. The donation will help the organization make building improvements that will benefit students and ultimately improve their quality of education.
“Funding such as this is vital to the life and survival of a small, rural, Christian school,” said Tracy Rosenberg, principal at Community Christian School. “We rely completely on small grants, private donations and tuition.”
For five years, America’s Farmers Grow Communities has collaborated with farmers to donate over $16.5 million to over 7,300 community organizations across rural America. This year winning farmers will direct another $3.3 million to nonprofits to help fight rural hunger, purchase life saving fire and EMS equipment, support ag youth leadership programs, buy much needed classroom resources, and so much more.
America’s Farmers Grow Communities is part of the America’s Farmers initiative. Since 2010, the America’s Farmers campaign and programs have advocated on behalf of farmers and their efforts to meet society’s needs through agriculture. Today, consumers are more interested than ever in agriculture and how food is grown. Consider joining the conversation and helping to raise awareness about agriculture. Learn more at FoodDialogues.com.
A sister program in the America’s Farmers effort, Grow Rural Education, is currently in its farmer nomination phase. Farmers interested in supporting math and science education in their communities should visit www.GrowRuralEducation.com from now through April 1 to learn how.

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With video:From Milaca choir student to music teacher http://millelacscountytimes.com/2015/03/26/from-milaca-choir-student-to-music-teacher/ http://millelacscountytimes.com/2015/03/26/from-milaca-choir-student-to-music-teacher/#comments Fri, 27 Mar 2015 01:30:55 +0000 http://millelacscountytimes.com/?p=110519

New Richmond (Wisconsin) Middle School choir students traveled in three Greyhound buses to make a quick stop at Milaca High School to perform at the Dahlager Theater on March 19.
The school’s choir and general music teacher, Katelyn Peterson, planned the choir’s trip to Duluth, where her students sang at the University of Wisconsin-Superior and had a review session with a college professor. On the way there, the group performed in Osceola, Wisconsin, and then made a special trip to Peterson’s hometown of Milaca.
Peterson was raised on the dairy farm that her parents, Lin and Warren Peterson, still own today. Growing up, Peterson’s father played bluegrass and introduced her to music.
“I like those good old bluegrass harmonies,” she said.
Throughout middle school and high school, Peterson participated in the band and choir. After graduating from Milaca High School in 2006, she decided to study English at the University of Wisconsin-River Falls to become a teacher. She later changed her major.
“My first year out I decided I wanted to be a music teacher,” Peterson said.
In 2011, Peterson graduated college with a BME in choral and general K-12 music education and a minor in musical theater. For the past four years she has been teaching choir and general music, as well as directing high school drama. Peterson said she incorporates laughing into her teaching style.
“Sometimes we sing,” she joked. “I enjoy the kids, singing music and planning stuff like this. I’m very blessed to have my job. I love my position. It’s strange being here with my own students.”
The New Richmond Middle School choral music program exposes students to a wide variety of works with a goal to provide a proper balance in the study and performance of choral music. Peterson’s choir class covers secular, sacred, cultural and foreign language music. Through the school choir, students are given the opportunity to learn about their voices and participate in quality musical ensemble.
“They get to be a part of a team in a different way. We’ve been working on these songs for about seven weeks. We had a concert for parents last week,” Peterson said.
During February’s Black History Month, Peterson’s students were able to learn about songs with coded messages. During their Milaca performance on March 19, the choir sang “Wade in the Water,” a spiritual piece associated with the songs of the Underground Railroad. Peterson said her students are able to learn about history without opening a text book.
After the local concert, the students were transported by bus to the First Baptist Church of Milaca for lunch. There, Peterson’s parents joined them.

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Who to Call in Hard Times http://millelacscountytimes.com/2015/03/26/who-to-call-in-hard-times/ http://millelacscountytimes.com/2015/03/26/who-to-call-in-hard-times/#comments Thu, 26 Mar 2015 20:30:46 +0000 http://millelacscountytimes.com/?guid=93a1f6c134e7c83e24df2ba85380857e What a lot of people don’t understand about financial advisors is that they are not there solely to plan your future. They are at your side when a present-day catastrophe strikes.

Everyone faces a serious, non-voluntary life-changing event at least once. It could be the death of a spouse, a layoff, a divorce or a very serious illness, something that is often very emotional and not in a good way. Some people may call their parents for support, and others may contact close friends. After those phone calls are made – who next? A financial advisor.

People who are hard hit emotionally may not be able to consider all aspects and nuances of their situation. They need someone to help them understand how those changes affect their financial pictures before they are able to devise a plan to mitigate the harm. An advisor is that someone.

I’ve had clients contact me when hard times came upon them. Although I am not a therapist, I was able to really help my clients look at the event without all of the emotion that clouds their judgment and create an action plan to help them survive.

One of my clients, a young married woman with two small children, called me after she was diagnosed with an aggressive cancer that was spreading. She was afraid that the life insurance company would cancel her policy.

I assured her that the policy was still effective because she paid the premiums. The life insurance policy would still protect her kids. I also asked delicately about estate plans. If things did not go well, everything was in place. The reassurance that all financial pieces were set gave her peace of mind. Fortunately, she survived and is doing well.

During the Great Recession, a number of clients called me in distress. They lost their jobs, worrying about paying monthly expenses. Some wanted to tap into their retirement accounts to help them with the financial shortfalls.

I explained the tax ramifications of taking distributions early and how they might be able to make up for their savings losses once they were employed again. I discussed with them how to create a budget. I also asked them about the health and life insurance that might be gone along with their jobs and how to replace these benefits. 

An advisor not only helps you make sound financial decisions at times of emotions but prepares you for the catastrophes before they hit. Nobody can plan for every single permutation of events that can occur. But it is much easier to tailor a plan if you have savings or life insurance to cover your back.

Financial worries add to one’s distress during major life changes. Call your financial advisor who will listen to your problems, provides guidance on your decisions and makes plans to keep you covered.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq

Wendy Spencer, CFP, CDFA, is president of Spencer Capital Strategies Inc., an independent Money Concepts contractor in Arvada, Colo. She is also a family law mediator; her divorce website is www.divorcemoneypro.com.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

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What a lot of people don’t understand about financial advisors is that they are not there solely to plan your future. They are at your side when a present-day catastrophe strikes.

Everyone faces a serious, non-voluntary life-changing event at least once. It could be the death of a spouse, a layoff, a divorce or a very serious illness, something that is often very emotional and not in a good way. Some people may call their parents for support, and others may contact close friends. After those phone calls are made – who next? A financial advisor.

People who are hard hit emotionally may not be able to consider all aspects and nuances of their situation. They need someone to help them understand how those changes affect their financial pictures before they are able to devise a plan to mitigate the harm. An advisor is that someone.

I’ve had clients contact me when hard times came upon them. Although I am not a therapist, I was able to really help my clients look at the event without all of the emotion that clouds their judgment and create an action plan to help them survive.

One of my clients, a young married woman with two small children, called me after she was diagnosed with an aggressive cancer that was spreading. She was afraid that the life insurance company would cancel her policy.

I assured her that the policy was still effective because she paid the premiums. The life insurance policy would still protect her kids. I also asked delicately about estate plans. If things did not go well, everything was in place. The reassurance that all financial pieces were set gave her peace of mind. Fortunately, she survived and is doing well.

During the Great Recession, a number of clients called me in distress. They lost their jobs, worrying about paying monthly expenses. Some wanted to tap into their retirement accounts to help them with the financial shortfalls.

I explained the tax ramifications of taking distributions early and how they might be able to make up for their savings losses once they were employed again. I discussed with them how to create a budget. I also asked them about the health and life insurance that might be gone along with their jobs and how to replace these benefits. 

An advisor not only helps you make sound financial decisions at times of emotions but prepares you for the catastrophes before they hit. Nobody can plan for every single permutation of events that can occur. But it is much easier to tailor a plan if you have savings or life insurance to cover your back.

Financial worries add to one’s distress during major life changes. Call your financial advisor who will listen to your problems, provides guidance on your decisions and makes plans to keep you covered.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq

Wendy Spencer, CFP, CDFA, is president of Spencer Capital Strategies Inc., an independent Money Concepts contractor in Arvada, Colo. She is also a family law mediator; her divorce website is www.divorcemoneypro.com.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

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Answers to 4 Big $ Questions http://millelacscountytimes.com/2015/03/26/answers-to-4-big-questions/ http://millelacscountytimes.com/2015/03/26/answers-to-4-big-questions/#comments Thu, 26 Mar 2015 19:00:33 +0000 http://millelacscountytimes.com/?guid=1bb28ad231505ac09feb21c065b6c7b9 Costs of education and retirement are likely two of your biggest financial concerns. Just in time for tax season, here are answers to a couple of common questions on each important topic.

Education:

Are my student loans deductible? Student loans can be a heavy burden on many taxpayers. Luckily, the Internal Revenue Service allows you to deduct a portion of student loan interest, taken as an adjustment to your income.

This means you can claim the deduction even if you do not itemize deductions – that is, file a Schedule A on your IRS Form 1040 tax return. Unfortunately, the IRS also imposes many limitations on the deductibility of student loan interest: The maximum interest deduction is $2,500 for 2014.

To secure the deduction, you must have used the loan to pay for qualified education expenses and your modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) for last year cannot exceed $160,000 if you file taxes under the status married filing jointly or $80,000 if you file using another status. If you’re like most taxpayers, your MAGI is your adjusted gross income as figured on your federal income tax return before you subtract any deduction for student loan interest. 

Can I transfer a Direct PLUS loan to my child after graduation? You usually take out a Direct PLUS loan to pay for your child’s college education; your child still completes the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).

The U.S. Department of Education sets the interest rate on Direct PLUS loans; the rate also depends on the date of disbursement. Some parents assume they can transfer the loan to the child once the latter graduates. Unfortunately, no: You the parent are responsible for repaying the loan.

Retirement:

How often can I make changes to my 401(k)? Generally, you can change your 401(k) employer-sponsored retirement plan as often as you want. I say “generally” because employers can impose their own restrictions to prevent employees from trading in 401(k) plans.

Our firm strongly advises against actively trading in your 401(k) or trying to time the markets to boost returns. Rather, rebalance your portfolio periodically to minimize risk.

For example, your original blend of assets – such as stocks, bonds and other holdings – probably changed in the wake of differing returns. Your allocated percentage of different asset classes probably also shifted. To rebalance, you might sell a portion of the asset class that increased above your optimum target.

Review your 401(k) at least quarterly to ensure that the allocations you initially selected don’t deviate from your intended percentages. If they do, rebalance your entire portfolio, including your 401(k), to bring it back in line with your goals.

Is there still time to contribute to my individual retirement account? Despite what the calendar shows, 2014 is not over yet. Whether you have a Roth, traditional or simplified employee pension (SEP) IRA, you can still count a contribution toward your total for last year.

For 2014 and 2015, according to the IRS, your total contributions to all of your traditional and Roth IRAs cannot be more than $5,500 ($6,500 if you’re 50 or older) or your taxable compensation for the year if your compensation was less than this limit. If you’re self-employed, your contributions to a SEP-IRA cannot exceed the lesser of 25% of your compensation or $52,000 for 2014.

You must contribute funds to an existing or new IRA before the April 15 tax-filing deadline this year.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.
 
Ara Oghoorian, CFP, CFA, is the founder and president of ACap Asset Management in Los Angeles. A fee-only investment management firm, it specializes in helping doctors and physicians make sound financial decisions. Contact Ara at aoghoorian@acapam.com or on the Web at www.acapam.com.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

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Costs of education and retirement are likely two of your biggest financial concerns. Just in time for tax season, here are answers to a couple of common questions on each important topic.

Education:

Are my student loans deductible? Student loans can be a heavy burden on many taxpayers. Luckily, the Internal Revenue Service allows you to deduct a portion of student loan interest, taken as an adjustment to your income.

This means you can claim the deduction even if you do not itemize deductions – that is, file a Schedule A on your IRS Form 1040 tax return. Unfortunately, the IRS also imposes many limitations on the deductibility of student loan interest: The maximum interest deduction is $2,500 for 2014.

To secure the deduction, you must have used the loan to pay for qualified education expenses and your modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) for last year cannot exceed $160,000 if you file taxes under the status married filing jointly or $80,000 if you file using another status. If you’re like most taxpayers, your MAGI is your adjusted gross income as figured on your federal income tax return before you subtract any deduction for student loan interest. 

Can I transfer a Direct PLUS loan to my child after graduation? You usually take out a Direct PLUS loan to pay for your child’s college education; your child still completes the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).

The U.S. Department of Education sets the interest rate on Direct PLUS loans; the rate also depends on the date of disbursement. Some parents assume they can transfer the loan to the child once the latter graduates. Unfortunately, no: You the parent are responsible for repaying the loan.

Retirement:

How often can I make changes to my 401(k)? Generally, you can change your 401(k) employer-sponsored retirement plan as often as you want. I say “generally” because employers can impose their own restrictions to prevent employees from trading in 401(k) plans.

Our firm strongly advises against actively trading in your 401(k) or trying to time the markets to boost returns. Rather, rebalance your portfolio periodically to minimize risk.

For example, your original blend of assets – such as stocks, bonds and other holdings – probably changed in the wake of differing returns. Your allocated percentage of different asset classes probably also shifted. To rebalance, you might sell a portion of the asset class that increased above your optimum target.

Review your 401(k) at least quarterly to ensure that the allocations you initially selected don’t deviate from your intended percentages. If they do, rebalance your entire portfolio, including your 401(k), to bring it back in line with your goals.

Is there still time to contribute to my individual retirement account? Despite what the calendar shows, 2014 is not over yet. Whether you have a Roth, traditional or simplified employee pension (SEP) IRA, you can still count a contribution toward your total for last year.

For 2014 and 2015, according to the IRS, your total contributions to all of your traditional and Roth IRAs cannot be more than $5,500 ($6,500 if you’re 50 or older) or your taxable compensation for the year if your compensation was less than this limit. If you’re self-employed, your contributions to a SEP-IRA cannot exceed the lesser of 25% of your compensation or $52,000 for 2014.

You must contribute funds to an existing or new IRA before the April 15 tax-filing deadline this year.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.
 
Ara Oghoorian, CFP, CFA, is the founder and president of ACap Asset Management in Los Angeles. A fee-only investment management firm, it specializes in helping doctors and physicians make sound financial decisions. Contact Ara at aoghoorian@acapam.com or on the Web at www.acapam.com.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

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Oil Prices: Forget a Rebound http://millelacscountytimes.com/2015/03/26/oil-prices-forget-a-rebound/ http://millelacscountytimes.com/2015/03/26/oil-prices-forget-a-rebound/#comments Thu, 26 Mar 2015 16:02:51 +0000 http://millelacscountytimes.com/?guid=e44ae709a32f5d652106e9ef5204d5fa With the price of oil slashed in half since last summer, we keep hearing predictions that a reversal is waiting in the wings. Forget it. The showing of another energy product, natural gas, shows us why: Ever-improving technology keeps prices low, amid more efficient and cheaper production methods.

The price action of natural gas likely gives us clues about where oil prices are headed over the next several years. Natural gas prices used to be somewhat correlated with oil’s. After reaching peak levels in 2008, both natural gas and oil prices collapsed on weak demand in the recession. While oil prices rebounded over the next five years from about $40 to $110 per barrel, natural gas prices trended even lower.
 
Shown below are natural gas spot prices overlaid on the gas rig count – the number of drilling rigs. These rigs drill vertically (down), horizontally (to the side) or directionally (at a slanted angle). The chart shows natural gas prices declining from $12.69 in June 2008 to about $3 per million British thermal units (MMBtu) lately.

Macintosh HD:Users:aiqinc:Desktop:unnamed.jpg

Since the 2008 peak through the end of February, the U.S. gas rig count fell from 1,606 to 280, almost an 83% decrease. Yet U.S. dry natural gas production has increased from 1,681,469 million cubic feet (mcf) in mid 2008 to 2,303,935mcf at the end of 2014, a 37% production increase. (Dry natural gas is after producers processed it for distribution to consumers.) Basically, innovation made U.S. energy producers better, faster and cheaper at extracting gas from shale formations.
 
That’s why what happened with gas may be the best predictor of what is likely to happen in the oil market. Gas and oil in the U.S. are often extracted from shale formations. Fracking and other technology improved dramatically in the gas fields, causing increased productivity to drive prices lower. The implication: U.S. petroleum engineers will adapt to $50 and $60 oil prices by continuing to improve extraction technology and efficiency.
 
Since last October, when the oil-rig count hit a record of 1,609, the tally dipped to 922, according to a survey from oil services company Baker Hughes. The price of oil a year ago was roughly $100 per barrel and today around $50.
 
The prolonged depressed pricing in the natural gas market is an enormous red flag to those who believe oil prices will “correct” to higher levels in the next couple of years. It is also a reminder of the importance of technology innovation in the United States – and how productivity enhancements can create growth in unlikely areas. Not too long ago, meaningful extraction from shale formations seemed improbable. Then came the fracking revolution.

If you knew in 2008 that the natural gas rig count was going to fall so drastically, a forecast of gas production rising by 37% and prices falling by 76% made no sense. In investing, considering what seems improbable often pays off. As Warren Buffett stated in his most recent letter to shareholders: “The dynamism embedded in our market economy will continue to work its magic.”

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Nicholas Atkeson and Andrew Houghton are the founding partners of Delta Investment Management, a registered investment advisory firm in San Francisco, and authors of the new book, Win by Not Losing: A Disciplined Approach To Building And Protecting Your Wealth In The Stock Market By Managing Your RiskAdditional market commentary and investment advice is available via their websites at www.deltaim.com and www.deltawealthaccelerator.com

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

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With the price of oil slashed in half since last summer, we keep hearing predictions that a reversal is waiting in the wings. Forget it. The showing of another energy product, natural gas, shows us why: Ever-improving technology keeps prices low, amid more efficient and cheaper production methods.

The price action of natural gas likely gives us clues about where oil prices are headed over the next several years. Natural gas prices used to be somewhat correlated with oil’s. After reaching peak levels in 2008, both natural gas and oil prices collapsed on weak demand in the recession. While oil prices rebounded over the next five years from about $40 to $110 per barrel, natural gas prices trended even lower.
 
Shown below are natural gas spot prices overlaid on the gas rig count – the number of drilling rigs. These rigs drill vertically (down), horizontally (to the side) or directionally (at a slanted angle). The chart shows natural gas prices declining from $12.69 in June 2008 to about $3 per million British thermal units (MMBtu) lately.

Macintosh HD:Users:aiqinc:Desktop:unnamed.jpg

Since the 2008 peak through the end of February, the U.S. gas rig count fell from 1,606 to 280, almost an 83% decrease. Yet U.S. dry natural gas production has increased from 1,681,469 million cubic feet (mcf) in mid 2008 to 2,303,935mcf at the end of 2014, a 37% production increase. (Dry natural gas is after producers processed it for distribution to consumers.) Basically, innovation made U.S. energy producers better, faster and cheaper at extracting gas from shale formations.
 
That’s why what happened with gas may be the best predictor of what is likely to happen in the oil market. Gas and oil in the U.S. are often extracted from shale formations. Fracking and other technology improved dramatically in the gas fields, causing increased productivity to drive prices lower. The implication: U.S. petroleum engineers will adapt to $50 and $60 oil prices by continuing to improve extraction technology and efficiency.
 
Since last October, when the oil-rig count hit a record of 1,609, the tally dipped to 922, according to a survey from oil services company Baker Hughes. The price of oil a year ago was roughly $100 per barrel and today around $50.
 
The prolonged depressed pricing in the natural gas market is an enormous red flag to those who believe oil prices will “correct” to higher levels in the next couple of years. It is also a reminder of the importance of technology innovation in the United States – and how productivity enhancements can create growth in unlikely areas. Not too long ago, meaningful extraction from shale formations seemed improbable. Then came the fracking revolution.

If you knew in 2008 that the natural gas rig count was going to fall so drastically, a forecast of gas production rising by 37% and prices falling by 76% made no sense. In investing, considering what seems improbable often pays off. As Warren Buffett stated in his most recent letter to shareholders: “The dynamism embedded in our market economy will continue to work its magic.”

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Nicholas Atkeson and Andrew Houghton are the founding partners of Delta Investment Management, a registered investment advisory firm in San Francisco, and authors of the new book, Win by Not Losing: A Disciplined Approach To Building And Protecting Your Wealth In The Stock Market By Managing Your RiskAdditional market commentary and investment advice is available via their websites at www.deltaim.com and www.deltawealthaccelerator.com

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

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Recognizing Tax-Scam Callers http://millelacscountytimes.com/2015/03/26/recognizing-tax-scam-callers/ http://millelacscountytimes.com/2015/03/26/recognizing-tax-scam-callers/#comments Thu, 26 Mar 2015 16:02:48 +0000 http://millelacscountytimes.com/?guid=7557ffca232e1b60eb94901a3344f399 While the Internal Revenue Service may not be your favorite federal agency, criminals posing as IRS representatives are unquestionably the much bigger problem. Here’s what to know to protect yourself.

Scammers set increasingly treacherous traps for swindling taxpayers’ assets, identities or both. Favorite targets are those most likely to fall for the trickery and least able to afford it:  older adults, immigrants and widows or widowers.

Even if you’re not in any of these categories, don’t let down your guard. Tax scams can happen to anyone. In February, scammers even called the home of the commissioner of the Connecticut Department of Revenue Services, the state’s head taxation official. As Forbes blogger Kelly Phillip Erb wrote while recommending that all taxpayers be on high alert: “It’s tax season. That, unfortunately, also means that it’s fraud season.”

The current popular scam goes something like this: Someone claiming to represent the IRS or the U.S. Treasury Department calls or emails claiming that you owe money, are in general tax-related trouble or must take some immediate action (usually send them money) – or else.

Callers may also know a lot about you: your name and those of family members, a portion of your Social Security number or additional contact information. Often, scammers stole such information via Internet phishing.

Differentiating a fake IRS representative from the real deal may at first seem hard. One of your key defenses: Know how the U.S. tax agency actually engages in legitimate queries and, just as important, how it does not.

If you defraud the U.S. government, you may indeed incur fines, penalties and, in extreme cases, even jail time. None of these happens in an out-of-the-blue instant, though. Here are five actions the IRS will never take at the initial stages of a tax problem:

  1. Call to demand immediate payment or call about taxes you owe without first mailing you a bill.
  2. Demand that you pay taxes without giving you the opportunity to question or appeal the amount owed.
  3. Require you to use a specific payment method for your taxes, such as a prepaid debit card.
  4. Ask for your credit or debit card numbers over the phone.
  5. Threaten to bring in local police or other law enforcement to arrest you.

If you or a loved one receives a call involving any of the above tactics, you can bet it’s a scam. Your best responses:

  • Hang up. Just as you never politely converse with a burglar in your home or a thug on the street, there’s absolutely no need to stand on formalities here.
  • Report the call. Notify the IRS to help prevent others from succumbing to the scam. If possible, note the caller’s number.

Unfortunately, for every tax scam averted, others pop up. The IRS list of top tax schemes spans phone and Internet fraud to fake documents and crooked tax return preparers. To stay on top of the latest news, regularly visit the IRS tax scam/consumer alert page or talk to your financial advisor with questions and concerns.

We all benefit when we stand together against tax scams.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Sheri Iannetta Cupo, CFP, is a principal of SageBroadview Financial Planning with offices in Morristown, N.J., and Farmington, Conn. The SageBroadview blog covers a wide range of financial planning and life topics.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

]]>
While the Internal Revenue Service may not be your favorite federal agency, criminals posing as IRS representatives are unquestionably the much bigger problem. Here’s what to know to protect yourself.

Scammers set increasingly treacherous traps for swindling taxpayers’ assets, identities or both. Favorite targets are those most likely to fall for the trickery and least able to afford it:  older adults, immigrants and widows or widowers.

Even if you’re not in any of these categories, don’t let down your guard. Tax scams can happen to anyone. In February, scammers even called the home of the commissioner of the Connecticut Department of Revenue Services, the state’s head taxation official. As Forbes blogger Kelly Phillip Erb wrote while recommending that all taxpayers be on high alert: “It’s tax season. That, unfortunately, also means that it’s fraud season.”

The current popular scam goes something like this: Someone claiming to represent the IRS or the U.S. Treasury Department calls or emails claiming that you owe money, are in general tax-related trouble or must take some immediate action (usually send them money) – or else.

Callers may also know a lot about you: your name and those of family members, a portion of your Social Security number or additional contact information. Often, scammers stole such information via Internet phishing.

Differentiating a fake IRS representative from the real deal may at first seem hard. One of your key defenses: Know how the U.S. tax agency actually engages in legitimate queries and, just as important, how it does not.

If you defraud the U.S. government, you may indeed incur fines, penalties and, in extreme cases, even jail time. None of these happens in an out-of-the-blue instant, though. Here are five actions the IRS will never take at the initial stages of a tax problem:

  1. Call to demand immediate payment or call about taxes you owe without first mailing you a bill.
  2. Demand that you pay taxes without giving you the opportunity to question or appeal the amount owed.
  3. Require you to use a specific payment method for your taxes, such as a prepaid debit card.
  4. Ask for your credit or debit card numbers over the phone.
  5. Threaten to bring in local police or other law enforcement to arrest you.

If you or a loved one receives a call involving any of the above tactics, you can bet it’s a scam. Your best responses:

  • Hang up. Just as you never politely converse with a burglar in your home or a thug on the street, there’s absolutely no need to stand on formalities here.
  • Report the call. Notify the IRS to help prevent others from succumbing to the scam. If possible, note the caller’s number.

Unfortunately, for every tax scam averted, others pop up. The IRS list of top tax schemes spans phone and Internet fraud to fake documents and crooked tax return preparers. To stay on top of the latest news, regularly visit the IRS tax scam/consumer alert page or talk to your financial advisor with questions and concerns.

We all benefit when we stand together against tax scams.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Sheri Iannetta Cupo, CFP, is a principal of SageBroadview Financial Planning with offices in Morristown, N.J., and Farmington, Conn. The SageBroadview blog covers a wide range of financial planning and life topics.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

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Basic Ways to Save http://millelacscountytimes.com/2015/03/26/basic-ways-to-save/ http://millelacscountytimes.com/2015/03/26/basic-ways-to-save/#comments Thu, 26 Mar 2015 16:02:45 +0000 http://millelacscountytimes.com/?guid=b1a166aa950bfcc75d7f2ae07073ccd1 For those who struggle to save, here’s a tip: keep the money out of your reach.

I recently watched “Living on One,” a documentary about four college students’ efforts to spend a summer in Guatemala living on a dollar a day, as half of the citizens of Guatemala in poverty. The film explores the personal finance habits of people who have a hard time earning enough money to live on, much less save.

My favorite segment of the film discusses the concept of savings clubs, a popular strategy in less-developed areas of the world. Typically, a group of 12 people each agree to save $12 every month. However, instead of putting it in their own piggy bank, they contribute their $12 of savings to the group.

Then, one of the members keeps the full sum of $144. The person taking the lump sum alternates each month, so that consequently, every member of the club receives $144 once per year. If someone fails to contribute $12 during any given month, the group kicks that member out. He or she can no longer collect the $144.

I find these savings clubs fascinating because they highlight the most important and basic strategies to successful saving: eliminate your access to the funds you set aside, and create a motivation to place savings ahead of spending.

In the arena of personal finance, an occasional large sum is more valuable than several small ones. We spend smaller amounts of money more spontaneously, such as on nice dinners, but we are more likely to use a large lump sum to fund meaningful goals. In Guatemala, it can be a stove to cook food. Here, a car or a down payment on a home.

The savings club also forces members to prioritize savings by imposing a punishment. Most people earn a salary, pay bills, have fun and save the rest. Unfortunately, they have little, if any, left after all their expenses. A simple solution: You save first as soon as you receive your income and find a way to live off what is left.

Your employer-sponsored retirement plans, like 401(k)s, 403(b)s and 457s, has the same features as a savings club. You contribute relatively small sums consistently, and you don’t have access to the funds. You face a 10% penalty if you withdraw the money early. Further, a 401(k) forces you to save by taking the contribution out of your paycheck before you even receive it, so that you are certain to reach your monthly savings goal.

Of course, employer-sponsored retirement plans are superior to the primitive savings clubs because they allow you to invest in stocks and bonds, so you can achieve not only savings but growth on those savings.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Lon Jefferies, CFP, MBA, is an investment advisor with the fee-only financial planning firm Net Worth Advisory Group in Sandy, Utah. You can find Lon on Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+. Contact him at (801) 566-0740 or lon@networthadvice.com.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

]]>
For those who struggle to save, here’s a tip: keep the money out of your reach.

I recently watched “Living on One,” a documentary about four college students’ efforts to spend a summer in Guatemala living on a dollar a day, as half of the citizens of Guatemala in poverty. The film explores the personal finance habits of people who have a hard time earning enough money to live on, much less save.

My favorite segment of the film discusses the concept of savings clubs, a popular strategy in less-developed areas of the world. Typically, a group of 12 people each agree to save $12 every month. However, instead of putting it in their own piggy bank, they contribute their $12 of savings to the group.

Then, one of the members keeps the full sum of $144. The person taking the lump sum alternates each month, so that consequently, every member of the club receives $144 once per year. If someone fails to contribute $12 during any given month, the group kicks that member out. He or she can no longer collect the $144.

I find these savings clubs fascinating because they highlight the most important and basic strategies to successful saving: eliminate your access to the funds you set aside, and create a motivation to place savings ahead of spending.

In the arena of personal finance, an occasional large sum is more valuable than several small ones. We spend smaller amounts of money more spontaneously, such as on nice dinners, but we are more likely to use a large lump sum to fund meaningful goals. In Guatemala, it can be a stove to cook food. Here, a car or a down payment on a home.

The savings club also forces members to prioritize savings by imposing a punishment. Most people earn a salary, pay bills, have fun and save the rest. Unfortunately, they have little, if any, left after all their expenses. A simple solution: You save first as soon as you receive your income and find a way to live off what is left.

Your employer-sponsored retirement plans, like 401(k)s, 403(b)s and 457s, has the same features as a savings club. You contribute relatively small sums consistently, and you don’t have access to the funds. You face a 10% penalty if you withdraw the money early. Further, a 401(k) forces you to save by taking the contribution out of your paycheck before you even receive it, so that you are certain to reach your monthly savings goal.

Of course, employer-sponsored retirement plans are superior to the primitive savings clubs because they allow you to invest in stocks and bonds, so you can achieve not only savings but growth on those savings.

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Lon Jefferies, CFP, MBA, is an investment advisor with the fee-only financial planning firm Net Worth Advisory Group in Sandy, Utah. You can find Lon on Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+. Contact him at (801) 566-0740 or lon@networthadvice.com.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

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Population Growth’s Elixir http://millelacscountytimes.com/2015/03/26/population-growths-elixir/ http://millelacscountytimes.com/2015/03/26/population-growths-elixir/#comments Thu, 26 Mar 2015 16:02:30 +0000 http://millelacscountytimes.com/?guid=9260dc14bd7e182618c467eee8a8559b Will the world’s economy keep growing? Despite the doomsters’ wails, the answer is: Yes, it will. Why? Largely because the world’s population is growing. Sure, some individual nations lag (particularly those with shrinking populations). But an examination of the demographic data shows that the overall global outlook is encouraging.

The other morning, I was listening to Bloomberg Radio as I took my second grader, to school. The radio news program discussed Islamic State terrorists’ killing a Japanese journalist. Then it moved on to Eric Garner, who died in New York from a police chokehold.

My son piped up from the backseat and asked me, “Dad, why do so many people die every day?”

I answered, “Lots of people die every day, but even more people are born.”

He then pointed out, “But dad, they never talk about that part on the news.”

This conversation got me thinking about one of my favorite Warren Buffett investment themes, the ever-growing economic pie.

I wrote about the economic pie in December, but I didn’t go into exactly why the pie continues to grow over time. One of the primary reasons, of course, is our expanding population.

My conversation with my son piqued my curiosity. Later that morning, I did some research. I learned that, according to the Ecology Global Network, there are about 131 million births per year on earth. That’s approximately 360,000 babies born every day.

The same study shows that there are 55 million deaths each year, or approximately 151,000 per day.

My son was worried that with so many people dying that the earth might run out of people. But clearly that’s not a problem.

Let’s put these numbers into context:

  • About three football stadiums (assuming a stadium holds 50,000) full of people die every day.
  • About seven football stadiums full of people are born every day.

This explains why we’ve seen our global population balloon from 1900, when there were about 1.6 billion people, to today’s approximately seven billion. By 2030, there should be over eight billion people on earth, according to the Ecology Global Network’s population estimates.

While all this information answers my second grader’s original question, it happens to be an integral component of why the world’s economic pie continues to grow. More people demanding more goods (i.e., houses, cars, food, technology, medicine, fuel, etc.) creates and ever-increasing demand to supply those goods. That means companies will continue to meet that expanding demand, hence their earning have the opportunity to grow over time. Thus, the pie gets bigger.

Indeed, there are clearly more variables to a growing economic pie than just population increases, such as innovation, the education system, improving worker productivity, more intelligent use of data, and the list goes on. However, as a tailwind to economic growth, nothing beats the growth of a population.   

Take a look at some stats, from 2010 to 2014, from WorldBank.org for the GDP growth and Trading Economics for the population growth:

  • United States of America
    • Average annual gross domestic product growth over five years: 2.25%
    • Average yearly population growth over five years: 0.75%
  • China
    • GDP: 8.5 %
    • Population: 0.4%
  • India
    • GDP: 6.5 %
    • Population: 1.25 %
  • Italy
    • GDP: minus 0.5%
    • Population: minus 0.1%

Notice, the only country with negative GDP growth was Italy, which is also the country with negative population growth. Coincidence?

With all the detailed minutia that hits us every day, remember that it’s very often the simplest concepts that are the most important. Ultimately, our children have nothing to worry about when it comes to the world running out of people, and the economic pie will continue to grow.  

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Wes Moss, CFP, is the chief investment strategist for Capital Investment Advisors and a partner at Wela, both in Atlanta. He hosts “Money Matters,” a live financial advice show on Atlanta’s News 95-5 and AM 750 WSB Radio. In 2014 Barron’s Magazine named him as one of America’s top 1,200 Financial Advisors. His newly released book, You Can Retire Sooner Than You Think published by McGraw Hill, is available on Amazon, iTunes and at your local bookstore.

Wes writes weekly about personal finance in the “Bargain Hunter Section” for AJC.com, the site of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Wes is also the editor and writer for About.com’s Personal Finance blog. Connect with Wes on Twitter at @WesMoss365 and on Facebook at Wes Moss Money Matters. You can also visit his website, WesMoss.com to learn more about Wes, and take his complimentary Money and Happiness Quiz.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

]]>
Will the world’s economy keep growing? Despite the doomsters’ wails, the answer is: Yes, it will. Why? Largely because the world’s population is growing. Sure, some individual nations lag (particularly those with shrinking populations). But an examination of the demographic data shows that the overall global outlook is encouraging.

The other morning, I was listening to Bloomberg Radio as I took my second grader, to school. The radio news program discussed Islamic State terrorists’ killing a Japanese journalist. Then it moved on to Eric Garner, who died in New York from a police chokehold.

My son piped up from the backseat and asked me, “Dad, why do so many people die every day?”

I answered, “Lots of people die every day, but even more people are born.”

He then pointed out, “But dad, they never talk about that part on the news.”

This conversation got me thinking about one of my favorite Warren Buffett investment themes, the ever-growing economic pie.

I wrote about the economic pie in December, but I didn’t go into exactly why the pie continues to grow over time. One of the primary reasons, of course, is our expanding population.

My conversation with my son piqued my curiosity. Later that morning, I did some research. I learned that, according to the Ecology Global Network, there are about 131 million births per year on earth. That’s approximately 360,000 babies born every day.

The same study shows that there are 55 million deaths each year, or approximately 151,000 per day.

My son was worried that with so many people dying that the earth might run out of people. But clearly that’s not a problem.

Let’s put these numbers into context:

  • About three football stadiums (assuming a stadium holds 50,000) full of people die every day.
  • About seven football stadiums full of people are born every day.

This explains why we’ve seen our global population balloon from 1900, when there were about 1.6 billion people, to today’s approximately seven billion. By 2030, there should be over eight billion people on earth, according to the Ecology Global Network’s population estimates.

While all this information answers my second grader’s original question, it happens to be an integral component of why the world’s economic pie continues to grow. More people demanding more goods (i.e., houses, cars, food, technology, medicine, fuel, etc.) creates and ever-increasing demand to supply those goods. That means companies will continue to meet that expanding demand, hence their earning have the opportunity to grow over time. Thus, the pie gets bigger.

Indeed, there are clearly more variables to a growing economic pie than just population increases, such as innovation, the education system, improving worker productivity, more intelligent use of data, and the list goes on. However, as a tailwind to economic growth, nothing beats the growth of a population.   

Take a look at some stats, from 2010 to 2014, from WorldBank.org for the GDP growth and Trading Economics for the population growth:

  • United States of America
    • Average annual gross domestic product growth over five years: 2.25%
    • Average yearly population growth over five years: 0.75%
  • China
    • GDP: 8.5 %
    • Population: 0.4%
  • India
    • GDP: 6.5 %
    • Population: 1.25 %
  • Italy
    • GDP: minus 0.5%
    • Population: minus 0.1%

Notice, the only country with negative GDP growth was Italy, which is also the country with negative population growth. Coincidence?

With all the detailed minutia that hits us every day, remember that it’s very often the simplest concepts that are the most important. Ultimately, our children have nothing to worry about when it comes to the world running out of people, and the economic pie will continue to grow.  

Follow AdviceIQ on Twitter at @adviceiq.

Wes Moss, CFP, is the chief investment strategist for Capital Investment Advisors and a partner at Wela, both in Atlanta. He hosts “Money Matters,” a live financial advice show on Atlanta’s News 95-5 and AM 750 WSB Radio. In 2014 Barron’s Magazine named him as one of America’s top 1,200 Financial Advisors. His newly released book, You Can Retire Sooner Than You Think published by McGraw Hill, is available on Amazon, iTunes and at your local bookstore.

Wes writes weekly about personal finance in the “Bargain Hunter Section” for AJC.com, the site of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Wes is also the editor and writer for About.com’s Personal Finance blog. Connect with Wes on Twitter at @WesMoss365 and on Facebook at Wes Moss Money Matters. You can also visit his website, WesMoss.com to learn more about Wes, and take his complimentary Money and Happiness Quiz.

AdviceIQ delivers quality personal finance articles by both financial advisors and AdviceIQ editors. It ranks advisors in your area by specialty, including small businesses, doctors and clients of modest means, for example. Those with the biggest number of clients in a given specialty rank the highest. AdviceIQ also vets ranked advisors so only those with pristine regulatory histories can participate. AdviceIQ was launched Jan. 9, 2012, by veteran Wall Street executives, editors and technologists. Right now, investors may see many advisor rankings, although in some areas only a few are ranked. Check back often as thousands of advisors are undergoing AdviceIQ screening. New advisors appear in rankings daily.

 

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Gravel Hauling http://millelacscountytimes.com/2015/03/26/gravel-hauling/ http://millelacscountytimes.com/2015/03/26/gravel-hauling/#comments Thu, 26 Mar 2015 11:43:27 +0000 http://millelacscountytimes.com/?p=110504 MILACA TOWNSHIP
GRAVEL HAULING QUOTES
Sealed price quotes will be received until 7:00 PM, Apr. 13, 2015 at the regular town board meeting at the Milaca Twp. Hall located at 14511 170th St., Milaca, MN 56353 at which time the quotes will be opened and read aloud. Quotes will be accepted for loading and delivering 3,500 – 5000 CY (loose volume) of Class 5 aggregate to Milaca Township roads. Motorgrader work shall not be included in this quote. Material is stockpiled in the Herges Pit with access on 130th Ave. or CSAH 9. Stockpile(s) may be eroded so it is imperative of the loader operator to mix the material as it is being loaded. A minimum of 4 belly dumps hauling is required. End dumps are not acceptable except for tight locations, if any.
Note #1: Work shall be completed by July 1, 2015. Quotes shall be per cubic yard and shall not include the cost of material. No extra payment will be made for fuel escalation. A certificate of insurance is required to be submitted with the quote.
Note #2: Work shall be completed by July 1, 2015. Milaca Township reserves the right to reject all quotes. For particulars call Ed; 320-294-5572 or Dean; 320.983.3183. Sealed quotes shall be labeled Gravel Hauling Quote and may be presented at the meeting or mailed to Milaca Township Clerk, 11242 180 St., Milaca, MN 56353.
Published in the
Mille Lacs County Times
March 26, 2015
362717

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