Foundation gives $20,000 for bandshell foundation repairs

Joel Stottrup / Union-Eagle Benton Telecommunications Foundation coordinator Teresa Nelson hands the foundation’s $25,000 grant check to Milaca City Council member Dave Dillan. In back are Cheryl Scapanski, general manager of the foundation, council member Norris Johnson and Milaca City Administrator Greg Lerud.

Joel Stottrup / Union-Eagle
Benton Telecommunications Foundation coordinator Teresa Nelson hands the foundation’s $25,000 grant check to Milaca City Council member Dave Dillan. In back are Cheryl Scapanski, general manager of the foundation, council member Norris Johnson and Milaca City Administrator Greg Lerud.

The old Milaca band shell, which has been the venue for countless outdoor events, including a bluegrass music festival at last year’s Rec Fest in Milaca, will be getting a second phase of rehabilitation this year due to a recent $20,000 grant.
The grant is from the Benton Telecommunications Foundation. The foundation’s consulting coordinator, Teresa Nelson, handed the check to Milaca City Council Member Dave Dillan on Feb. 25. Also on hand were Cheryl Scapanski, general manager of the foundation, Council Member Norris Johnson, and Milaca City Administrator Greg Lerud.
“We were very happy to be part of the process of supporting restoration of the band shell and are looking forward to its success,” Scapanski said.
The $20,000 will be used to rehabilitate the foundation and rock surface that is around the perimeter of the band shell in what will be Phase II of the band shell rehab project.
Phase I, installing new asphalt shingles on the roof, was carried out last year. The $16,000 cost of the new roof came out of donations totaling $23,000 to $24,000 to Rum River Community Foundation.
Phase III will involve rehabilitating the inside of the band shell and Phase IV will be landscaping around it.
Lerud and the council members who were assembled to accept the $20,000 check didn’t know if the band shell was a federal Works Progress Administration project in the 1930s. But because of the rock used in its construction, it had the appearance of various other WPA projects in the United States.
The WPA was one of then-President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s New Deal initiatives to put more people back to work during the Great Depression and improve infrastructure across the country. The Works Progress Administration was later renamed the Works Projects Administration.
Besides another round of bluegrass music at Rec Fest in late July, plans are to expand Milaca’s Music in the Park series.

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