Twenty-one MHS students inducted into National Honor Society

Newly inducted NHS member Jack Barsody is congratulated after signing his name in the NHS membership book. Times photo by Hannah Dillon

Newly inducted NHS member Jack Barsody is congratulated after signing his name in the NHS membership book.
Times photo by Hannah Dillon

Approximately 1 million students across 50 states, U.S. territories and Canadian provinces have been inducted into the National Honor Society, a program created to celebrate outstanding high school students.
Add another 21 for the Milaca High School students who were inducted into the NHS Sunday in the Dahlager Theater.
This year’s 2013-2014 NHS inductees are: Rachel Airhart, Tara Airhart, Jack Barsody, Ashley Cope, Gabrielle Fredman, Michael Garber, Erin Hackenmueller, Mackenzie Horrigan, Bennett Lerud, Jacob Olson, Cole Patten, Alexandra Ploeger, Paige Quaintance, Kimberly Shipman, Malayna Sikkink, Ellen So, Laura Stobb, Alesia Terpstra, Matt VanSomeren, Makayla Wiedewitsch and Nick Wolbert.
NHS has four characteristics that it upholds: scholarship, leadership, service and character.
“Four main purposes have guided chapters of NHS from the beginning: to create enthusiasm for scholarship; to stimulate a desire to render service; to promote leadership; and to develop character in the students of secondary schools,” the NHS website details.
Megan Vetter, the ceremony’s guest speaker, focused on “character” with a whimsical and personalized speech. Vetter is an English teacher at Milaca High School and was an NHS president at her high school.
NHS began in 1921, but Milaca High School’s NHS started in the 1940s with four students. Milaca activities director Jerry Westphal said this year’s group of inductees is the biggest he’s seen since taking on the role of NHS adviser 10 years ago.
To be inducted into NHS, students must apply, Westphal explained. A team from the school then selects the student applicants who will be inducted, based on how they fit into the four characteristics that are central to NHS.
The ceremony was short but sweet and sentimental, as both speakers encouraged students to do their best and congratulated them on their accomplishment.
“They’re the future that we have to look forward to,” Westphal said. “They’ll do great things.”

Comments Closed

up arrow